#LfK

I love living in Lawrence, Kansas. One of its charms is how we locals work to maintain the character of this little city. This includes a firm commitment to our artists and public scholars–as well as to our beloved characters who grace the coffee shops & bars. We love parades, Mass. street, Nerd Night, and Liberty Hall. We are especially fond of this town’s complex history.

#1. Blogging

It’s been nearly 10 years since I first began blogging. Since then, this blog (like myself) has undergone several iterations. Keeping a blog has assisted both my personal and professional lives — it has provided me a way to share my experiences as an activist and has offered me a way to think through several of my research and creative interests.

Essential Readings in Indigenous and American Indian Studies (Draft)

Indigenous and American Indian Studies is a field that explores and analyzes Tribal Nationhood: sovereignty, self-determination, Tribal Nation rebuilding, and respectful coexistence. It seeks to promote and foster the understanding and practice of each of these four elements. While not a legal or history or a literary or anthropology field, Indigenous and American Indian studies can utilize these subjects–and others–to further understanding of the development and growth of a contemporary and robust, thriving Tribal nationhood.

In Amour, a Look at a Love’s Last Dance

CAUTION: Spoilers!
“O

ld age,” Bette Davies reportedly said, “ain’t no place for sissies.” And neither, perhaps, is true love. Or so it is in Michael Haneke’s Amour, an intrepid reflection on just what it might take to see both old age and genuine romantic love through to the end of the line. Haneke wrote and directed this film and cast Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva to play Georges and Anne, retired music teachers in their 80s.